Stress Management

Whether nutritional, social, economic, cultural, physical or environmental, change requires adjustment. Change today is more complex and subtle, affecting all aspects of our lives. Most of us associate stress with negative life events – distress, ie. death, job loss, illness – however,
stress is equally created by positive life events – eustress – ie. marriage, birth, new job.

Stress is a root cause of diabetes which links to many other diseases. Knowing who you are means knowing what you want, being willing and able to take care of yourself, and asking for what you want and need. It requires work, but the rewards are great. Integrating all that you are and do is the key to managing stress.

Participants are empowered by:

  • Learning to manage stress which promotes physical, emotional and mental health.
  • Making lifestyle changes or treatment plans that are defined and achievable.
  • Creating self-management and self-responsibility tools for personal health and optimal work performance.

As we are in the body, so we are in the mind. As we are in the mind, so we are in the body. Learn techniques which you can use to relax the mind and body. Enhance your performance by learning different ways to handle stress.

Use everyday stretches to release tensions in the body.

Learn different breathing techniques to relax the body and calm the mind.

Listen to sounds that calm the body and mind. Listen to music that transcends time and space.

Allow the mind to flow with sitting meditation simply focusing on the present. Create a sense of peace and liberation within.

Walking meditation to bring awareness to the present moment while you focus on every movement and breath as you walk.

Experience massage therapy to locate and release tension in the body.

Experience shamanic drumming journey to profound states of silence.

Work together with group dynamics to accomplish desired outcomes through interdependence and trust.

Learn progressive muscle relaxation techniques to bring awareness to the body by holding it tight and then releasing — retraining the body and mind to “let go”.